Pencil sketch re-creating a Japanese photograph of a girl in a kimono, touching the 10 foot tail of a Japanese rooster on a tall perch.

I love to share poetry and creative expression of all kinds with other people, and I'm so excited to start sharing a weekly poetry challenge with the world.  We'll be exploring a variety of poetic forms and prompt themes, to push ourselves into new styles of expression and creative release.  This first week, we'll start simply with the Haiku!

I don't mean to imply that a haiku is an easy poem to master.  Its simplicity is a part of its beauty, and it takes practice to create a story arch over such a short space.  This traditional Japanese poem has a strict format that is traditionally only 17 symbols, structured in three lines of 5/7/5.

This is a haiku.
It has seven syllables,
followed by five more.

Haiku capture a snapshot of the world in a few words.  They're often composed of incomplete thoughts, though they can form complete, proper sentence structure.  It's a short form burst of wordplay that has become an all-time favorite to write, and I'm proud to say that my first personal collection of poetry was a private collection of haiku. I'm really looking forward to sharing these with all of you, and I can't wait to see what you create!  Please share your haiku creations in the comments below.

 

 

As the dawn breaks fresh,
the rooster crows in mourning.
the moon slips silent.

Pencil sketch re-creating a Japanese photograph of a girl in a kimono, touching the 10 foot tail of a Japanese rooster on a tall perch.
Handwritten, cursive signature says "pea flower tea" in lowercase letters. The flower is a small sketch of a bloom, instead of the word for "flower".
If an idea doesn't explode orgasms of bright sparks, cascading into and setting my own dark places alight, then I probably won't write about it.

Tell me something that moves you.

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